My one piece of advice

I like to think that I’m a helpful person – it’s just that my areas of expertise is very specialised and I don’t get to be helpful as often as a lot of people. But over the years I have been asked my opinion by a number of friends about their audio set-ups or problems. This last year I’ve been able to help more people on a more formal level through my work as Bee Productive. It’s a part of the job that I really love, and when I’ve had to do it at a distance and troubleshoot a studio without being there in person or seeing exactly how the set-up is set up it has added an extra edge to the challenge.

So if the hypothetical person came to me and asked, “Rob, with your years of experience of helping people with their home studios what is the one piece of advice you would give people?” I would stroke my beard thoughtfully for a couple of minutes and say, “Hmmm…” a bit. Then I would give the following answer.

If you are putting together or upgrading your own studio you would do very well to be getting advice from people operating a similar set up to what you’re looking to get for yourself. But my advice is ‘Don’t ask too many people for advice.’

Here I have to claim a vested interest in that advice. It’s a part of my business model to offer advice and help with studio upgrades, but whether you are using my services or not I would stick with that piece of advice. Here’s why.

Whatever you’re doing with audio there is always multiple ways to do it. There are many pieces of hardware and software on the market for every conceivable task and everyone has their favourites. Not only that, but there are always multiple ways to plug things in, keyboard short cuts or software processes. And that’s before you get into the ‘geek politics’ of audio – the arguments like digital vs analogue, wav vs mp3 and the like which can lead people into all sorts of arguments about methodology and cause them to decry each other’s abilities. In short the number of people you ask is the number of different answers you will get. Everyone will recommend their way of doing things and possibly rubbish other people’s suggestions as not as good as their own, which can lead to the solutions becoming more confusing than they were before. I’ve seen it happen and I’ve had to untangle the bewilderment of ideas.

I would advise finding 2 or maybe 3 people at most who’s opinions you can trust and sticking with them. Discuss and cross reference between people as much as you need to to get things clear in your head. But don’t ask too many people.

(Sales pitch bit) I would always try to recommend a solution that matches a client’s skill level and what they’ll be using their studio for, with an element of future-proofing if possible.

Here endeth today’s lesson.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s